5 Tips for keeping the promises you made to yourself

by | Jan 5, 2023 | Life Planning | 0 comments

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Planning for the unexpected

If you are like me, you have made plenty of promises to yourself that you haven’t kept. Here are five tips to help make it easier for you to keep your financial promises to yourself.

1. Ask yourself what matters most to you,
then make a list of the top 10 things. It’s your list, and no one else has to see it. No matter what it is, write it down.

2. Get a copy of your bank or credit card statements, and review where your money went.

3. Be real with yourself.
What impact did the expenditures you just reviewed have on those 10 things that matter most to you? Was it positive or negative?

4. Examine your attitude toward or relationship with money.
How do you view money? What life events have helped shape your view? Do you think money is the answer to all your problems or a tool you can use?

5. Before you make a new purchase or click checkout to purchase those items in your shopping cart, ask yourself what impact this expenditure will have on the 10 things that matter most to you.

If your life experiences and attitude toward money are negative, perhaps you have been unintentionally sabotaging yourself financially. With help, and by changing how you view and spend money, you can turn things around. If you have a positive financial attitude and are in a good financial situation, perhaps it is time to consider how you can have an even greater positive impact on the 10 things that matter most to you.

Kathy P. Rogers

Life Planner

“The process of planning for the unexpected begins with a conversation. I want to get to know you – your dreams, your goals, your passions. I want to know what makes you who you are. My goal is to listen, then help you design a plan that aligns with all these things as well as your budget.”

 Kathy Rogers is the vice president of Marston Rogers Group, a life planner and financial consultant. Reach her at (228) 206-5902 or at kathy@marstonrogers.com.

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